Sunday Post

Book arrivals:

No new books in my mailbox last week 🙂

Last week on Bookfan:

the summertime girls (8:4)   DearCarolinaCoverHighRes   Nantucket (8:25)

Currently reading:

if you only knew (8:25)

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#FitReaders Weekly Check-in

FitReaders2015

#FitReaders is hosted by  Geeky Bloggers Book Blog  and That’s What I’m Talking About.

Last week was quiet – I took it easy with exercise on the weekend.

Fitbit steps:

  • Fri        4333
  • Sat       8509
  • Sun      3183
  • Mon  13809
  • Tue     11724
  • Wed   12488
  • Thu    10066

Read on the treadmill:

a window opens (8:25)

Nantucket by Nan Rossiter (plus a US Giveaway)

  • Nantucket (8:25)Title:  Nantucket
  • Author:  Nan Rossiter
  • Genre:  Contemporary Fiction
  • Published:  August 25, 2015 – Kensington
  • Source:  Publisher

Synopsis:  Over twenty-five years ago, Liam Tate and Acadia McCormick Knox fell in love. It was summer on Nantucket, and eighteen-year-old Liam knew that wealthy, college-bound Cadie was way out of league for a local boy who restored boats for a living. Yet the two became inseparable, seizing every chance to slip away in Liam’s runabout to secluded spots, far from the world that was trying to keep them apart. 

After Cadie returned home to New York and discovered she was pregnant, her parents crushed any hope of communicating with the boy she’d left behind. Unanswered letters and calls couldn’t change Liam’s heart, but over the years he’s settled into a simple, solitary life in his rambling beachfront house. Now he’s learned that Cadie is returning to Nantucket for the opening of her son’s art show. Over a weekend of revelations and poignant memories, Cadie and Liam have an opportunity to confront the difference time can make, the truths that never alter, and the bittersweet second chances that arrive just in time to steer a heart back home… (publisher)

My take: Nantucket is the story of Liam and Cadie. We learn about their history in chapters that alternate between 1989 and the present. Usually when this technique is used in a novel I prefer one time period over the other but Nan Rossiter did it flawlessly and I was engrossed in both.

I loved Liam’s willingness to open himself to Cadie and her family when it would have been so much easier to keep living his closed-off life. Cadie risked a lot by coming back to Nantucket but she knew she had to do it. I was also charmed by the children in the novel. They added so much to the emotional tone of many scenes.

Of course, I loved the Nantucket setting. The passages describing Liam’s job of building and repairing boats were interesting and, at the same time, helpful in the understanding of Liam himself.

Nantucket is an emotional and romantic story of love, forgiveness, trust and second chances. I really liked it and recommend it to fans of Nan Rossiter and women’s fiction.


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Nantucket (8:25)


Guest Post by Kristy Woodson Harvey (plus a US Giveaway)

DearCarolinaCoverHighRes

You know how people talk about their life flashing before their eyes? About how they see everything that ever happened to them in a single moment? I always thought that sounded crazy. Until, of course, it happened to me. But it wasn’t with my own life; it was with the life of my characters, Jodi and Khaki, in my debut novel DEAR CAROLINA. Maybe it was from the near­-psychosis of new­-mommy exhaustion…

My husband and I had been home from the hospital five or six days with our brand­new, beautiful bundle of a son. All was well—or as well as it can be when you’re running on a couple of hours of sleep!

My parents were still at our house, and they had taken our sweet new son into their room so that my husband and I could take a much-­needed early evening nap. It seems like as soon as I fell asleep, I heard that tiny cry that had become my alarm clock. He’s okay, I reassured myself. I had just fed him, and, if he needed to be changed or put to sleep, my parents could handle it. They had, after all, raised me with very few complications!

But the crying continued until I finally stumbled, bleary-­eyed, over the threshold of my bedroom and into theirs. My dad handed my son to me with a mumbled apology and, in that instant, my baby stopped crying.

I walked back into my room and, still holding him, looked into his eyes, and he looked into mine. Oh my gosh, I remember thinking. I am a mother. I felt that now very familiar tug on what seemed like all of my insides, that almost painful joy that I was the person who would get to raise this child. I would get to see him smile for the first time, take his first steps, and, if I was very lucky, maybe one day in the very far-­off future, become a parent himself.

In that very same instant I remember asking myself a question: What would have to happen in your life for you to be able to part with your child? And what would it feel like to know that another woman had this type of deep, forever connection with your child, the child you had adopted. Jodi and Khaki, the two main characters in Dear Carolina, were simply there in that moment, complete with their pasts, presents and futures. They were as alive in my mind as anyone I’ve ever known.

They were both there, both acknowledging the fact that giving up your child, giving this love and this connection that I had with my son, to someone else, was the ultimate gift that one woman could ever give another. They were showing me that breaking that connection would undoubtedly be the most difficult decision that one woman would ever make. And the easiest that another would make would be to accept that gift and get to be the mother that brought this child up in the world.

Because I knew instinctively in that moment too that, sure, I had given birth to this baby, but that deep, heart-­wrenching love, that wasn’t about feeling kicks in my belly or being the first person to hold him; it was about seeing my child and knowing that I would do anything in heaven or on earth to protect him. It was about picturing this grand and glorious future laid out in front of us because I was his mother and he was my son.

I knew that my character Khaki felt that exact same way. And, in that way, Dear Carolina was a story that wrote itself, a story of love and family, of sacrifice and commitment. The story itself—and the process of getting it published—was about facing biggest fears and wildest dreams all at the same time. And then saying “yes” to both of them.


Kristy HarveyKristy Woodson Harvey holds a degree in journalism and mass communications from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a master’s in English from East Carolina University. She writes about interior design and loves connecting with readers. She lives in North Carolina with her husband and three-year-old son. Dear Carolina is her first novel.


Praise for Dear Carolina:

Southern to the bone and full of engaging characters, Dear Carolina is a strikingly beautiful story of love and sacrifice. Kristy Woodson Harvey’s debut novel captures your heart and doesn’t let go; her keen insights into a mother’s love will stay with you long after the last page. ” — Kim Boykin, author of Palmetto Moon and The Wisdom of Hair

US Giveaway

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DearCarolinaCoverHighRes


The Summertime Girls by Laura Hankin

  • the summertime girls (8:4)Title:  The Summertime Girls
  • Author:  Laura Hankin
  • Genre:  Women’s Fiction
  • Published:  August 2015 – Berkley
  • Source:  Publisher

Synopsis:  When two lifelong friends reunite for one more summer in small-town Maine, they must bridge the gap caused by the dreams and secrets that tore them apart…

Ally Morris and Beth Abbott were beyond inseparable. From the very first time they met, the girls knew they’d found a once-in-a-lifetime friendship. But sometimes, life can’t help but get in the way.

As time goes by, disappointments and petty resentments begin to alter what they once thought was forever. Ally’s boho lifestyle leaves her drowning in confusion and cheap whisky, while a terrible secret threatens to shatter Beth’s carefully controlled world. By the time they need each other most, Ally and Beth are nearly strangers to each other.

When a family crisis prompts Beth to contact Ally for help out of the blue, the girls reunite in Maine. But the distance between them is overwhelming. To save their friendship, Ally and Beth will have to confront painful moments in their past and redefine who they are—before their incredible connection fades away for good…  (publisher)

My take:  The Summertime Girls is about two friends, Ally and Beth. Like many friendships that have lasted a long time there have been ups and downs. There’s blame to go around, misunderstandings, and lots of hurt feelings. But there are bright times too. What Beth and Ally need to decide is whether they want to give up on the other or keep trying to get back to the friendship they once had.

Ally just went through a rough breakup and is a live wire reacting to whatever comes in contact with her – much to her detriment.  Beth lives a good life but it’s based on guilt for what she has or what she can do with her life. I really felt sorry for her because she was in a constant struggle to prove that she’s a good person. If any two people ever needed to have a good friend who understands them it’s these two.

My favorite character is Owen, the young man who likes Beth but isn’t afraid to hold her accountable for her words and actions. To say anything else would be a spoiler.

There are a lot of emotions tied up in their story. I loved that their friendship mirrored the one Beth’s grandma had with a lost friend. The younger women could learn a lot from them. The Summertime Girls is a story about learning about life and relationships and forgiveness. And realizing it’s never too late to learn.

Sunday Post

Book arrivals:  (linked to Mailbox Monday)

second chance summer (audio)  You're the Best (10:27)

Last week on Bookfan:

  • Review: All the Single Ladies by Dorothea Benton Frank
  • Review: The Bourbon Kings by J.R. Ward
  • Review: Letters to the Lost by Iona Grey

all the single ladies  the bourbon kings (7:28)  letters to the lost (may'15)

Currently reading:

a window opens (8:25)

 

#FitReaders Weekly Check-in

FitReaders2015

#FitReaders is hosted by  Geeky Bloggers Book Blog  and That’s What I’m Talking About.

Last Saturday we went to the annual Irish Fest – great music, food and lots of walking.

IMG_4584

Two of our granddaughters (they’re cousins) at Irish Fest

Fitbit steps:

  • Fri:     12721
  • Sat:    17978
  • Sun:   10918
  • Mon:  12510
  • Tue:   12718
  • Wed:  11553
  • Thu:   11153

Read on the treadmill:

Ransom Canyon (8:25)